Fact Sheet April 23, 5:45 p.m.

Date: 5:45 p.m. Thursday, April 23, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor. Crews are working three excavation sites. Plans call for additional strategic digs to understand the flow path.
    • The outflow of the spill to the harbor is a buried perforated pipe from early VMT construction. It ends at the shoreline within the primary containment boom. The outflow is currently discharging high volumes of snow melt and rain water with a minor sheen. A system is being implemented to remove the sheen before the water enters the harbor.
    • Excavation continues around the sump (SU-3) that was the source of the spill to look for the oily water’s underground entry point. Care is being taken to dig around underground piping and utilities. Personnel are using air knives, which use compressed air to dig.
    • Excavation started at a new site south of the Oil Spill Response Building and SU-6, located downhill between SU-3 and the harbor.
  • Response crews using skimmers and current buster boom continued operations through the day.
    • An afternoon overflight of the work area and Port Valdez observed that all sheen was within containment.
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 23, 545 p.m.

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Fact Sheet April 23, 11 a.m.

Date: 11 a.m. Thursday, April 23, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Response crews using skimmers and current buster boom continued on-water operations overnight.
    • The primary boomed area has been reduced by two-thirds in recent days.
    • Much of the evening work involved changing out boom and monitoring boomed areas.
    • As of 5 a.m. Thursday, approximately 974 barrels (40,908 gallons) of water/oil mix has been collected from recovery activities on the water. Crews continue measuring and analyzing the composition of the collected liquids, a process known as metering.
    • To date, approximately 12 barrels (511 gallons) of oil has been recovered from the collected volumes metered; in addition, less than one barrel (30 gallons) of oil was recovered from land.
    • The exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom has contained the spill.
    • A Wednesday afternoon overflight above the work area and Port Valdez observed that all sheen was within containment.
  • Crews will continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor.
    • Crews are working three excavation sites and plans are in development for additional strategic digs focused on understanding the flow path.
    • The outflow of the spill to the harbor is a culvert that ends at the shoreline within the primary containment boom. The outflow is currently discharging high volumes of snow melt and rain water with a minor sheen. Engineers have a plan to stop the flow of oily water from the culvert before it enters the small boat harbor; excavation work to execute that plan is expected to begin today.
    • About 30 people are involved in the excavation efforts, including operators, laborers and surveyors in Valdez and Anchorage. More personnel are expected to join the work in the coming days.
  • There were no injuries or incidents reported from the overnight shift work. On Wednesday afternoon, a dayshift worker developed a rash on their hands while wearing gloves. The worker saw a medic on scene and was released back to work.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted. A laden oil tanker is expected to depart the VMT this afternoon (Thursday). As added layers of safety and observation, all tankers are currently departing the VMT during daylight hours.
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Many boats continue to work in the harbor area, from Vessels of Opportunity to Alyeska work boats like landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 23, 11 a.m

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Fact Sheet April 22, 6 p.m.

Date: 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor.
    • The outflow location is a culvert that ends at the shoreline within the primary containment boom. The outflow is currently discharging high volumes of snow melt and rain water with a minor sheen. Engineers are developing a plan to remove oil from the water flowing out of the pipe.
    • Excavation continues over an area that is 40 by 40 feet around the sump (SU-3) that was the source of the spill to look for the oily water’s underground entry point. Care is being taken to dig around underground piping and utilities. Personnel are using air knives, which use compressed air to dig, for the majority of the work.
    • Excavation at an area near the Oil Spill Response Building and SU-6, located downhill between SU-3 and the VMT small boat harbor, was completed without locating the flow path. Engineering is developing a dig plan for an area further west, which could be ready to excavate tomorrow.
    • About 30 people are involved in the excavation efforts, including operators, laborers, surveyors and engineers in Valdez and Anchorage. More personnel and added hours of excavation are expected in the coming days.

“As our response work evolves, we’ll continue developing ideas to help us find the flow path,” said Mike Day, Incident Commander and Alyeska representative in the Unified Command. “This will include a great deal of planning and excavation, some of it challenging. We have confidence in our people and our deliberate approach to completing the work effectively and safely.”

  • Response crews using skimmers and current buster boom continued operations through the day.
    • An afternoon overflight of the work area and Port Valdez observed that all sheen was within containment.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom has contained the spill.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted. The laden oil tanker, Polar Enterprise, departed the VMT this morning (Wednesday), and another tanker arrived this afternoon. As added layers of safety and observation, tankers are currently departing the VMT during daylight hours.
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 22, 6 p.m.

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Overflight April 22

 

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Fact Sheet April 22, 10:30 a.m.

Date: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 22, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Response crews using skimmers and buster systems continued operations overnight.
    • Overnight, a row of boom was secured at the outer edge of containment as a reinforcement for challenging tides and weather.
    • The primary boomed area has been reduced by two-thirds in recent days.
    • As of 5:30 a.m. Wednesday, approximately 925 barrels (38,850 gallons) of water/oil mix has been collected from recovery activities on the water. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the collected liquids, a process known as metering.
    • From those collected volumes metered so far, approximately 12 barrels (511 gallons) of oil has been recovered.
    • In addition, less than one barrel (30 gallons) have been recovered from land to date.
    • The exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
    • A 4:25 p.m. Tuesday overflight over the work area and Port Valdez observed that all sheen was within containment.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom has contained the spill.
  • Crews continue excavating and investigating the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor.
    • Teams have focused the work on two main excavation sites and are exploring and will expand to other dig sites in the days ahead.
    • About 30 people are involved in the excavation efforts, including operators, laborers and surveyors in Valdez and Anchorage. More personnel are expected to join the work in the coming days.
  • There were no injuries or incidents reported from the overnight shift work.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted. The laden oil tanker, Polar Enterprise, departed the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT), this morning (Wednesday), and another tanker is expected to arrive this afternoon. As added layers of safety and observation, all tankers are currently departing the VMT during daylight hours.
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 22, 1030 a.m

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Fact Sheet April 21, 6 p.m.

Date: 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 21, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor.
    • Teams are focusing on two main excavation sites.
      • Excavation is taking place around the sump that was the source of the spill, over an area that is 40 by 40 feet, in anticipation of finding the oily water’s underground entry point.
      • Crews are also excavating at the Oil Spill Response Building, located downhill between the sump and the VMT small boat harbor. They are excavating supported by a 10 foot by 10 foot trench box to create a potential collection point and prevent oily water from traveling downhill and entering the area of the VMT small boat harbor. A trench box is an engineered support for an excavation that prevents sloughing and protects personnel.
    • A team is determining an additional dig site near the Oil Spill Response Building.
    • About 30 people are involved in the excavation effort, including operators, laborers and surveyors in Valdez and Anchorage. More personnel are expected to be added in the coming days.
  • Over the past day, response crews and personnel have made progress in oily water collection in the harbor and reduced the primary boomed area by two-thirds.
    • The outflow location is from a culvert that ends at the shoreline within the primary containment boom. The outflow is currently discharging high volumes of snow melt and rain water with a minor sheen.
    • Two things have contributed to reduced collection rates and the smaller footprint: (1) an observed decline in oily water entering the Port and (2) more efficient skimming operations.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom is containing the spill.
    • During a Tuesday overflight, a light sheen was spotted near boom that was moved outside of the containment area, and crews mobilized for cleanup. They have expanded the boom and are adjusting tactics to adapt to tides.
  • “Alaskans are understandably concerned about the impact of a spill on wildlife,” said Crystal Smith, State On-Scene Coordinator and Department of Environmental Conservation representative in the Unified Command. “Our recovery efforts have reduced the area that has sheen in it, lessening the opportunity for birds, seals, and sea otters to make contact with oily water.”
  • Human activity has been limited on the VMT berths near the response area. Birds that are perched on this infrastructure often take flight when disturbed by people or equipment and could land nearby in the response area.
  • Wildlife task forces are on scene and continue surveying the area. Four deceased birds have been recovered since the start of the incident.
  • As a precaution to protect nearby sensitive areas and prevent wildlife disturbance in Port Valdez, four areas are being protected by boom and monitored regularly: the Solomon Gulch Hatchery, the Valdez Duck Flats, Saw Island and Seal Island.
  • As of 11 a.m. Tuesday, approximately 866 barrels (36,372 gallons) of water/oil mix has been collected from recovery activities on the water. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the collected liquids, a process known as metering.
    • From those collected volumes metered so far, approximately 511 gallons (12 barrels) of oil has been recovered.
    • In addition, 30 gallons of oil (less than one barrel) have been recovered from land to date.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • Testing of critical system piping, including all systems that have potential to contribute to the spill, was completed over the weekend; all piping passed pressure testing and verification of its integrity. There are no other leaks in the area.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted. The oil tanker, Polar Enterprise, arrived at the VMT this morning (Tuesday).
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 21, 6 p.m

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Overflight April 21

 

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Fact Sheet April 21, 11 a.m.

Date: 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 21, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • Response crews have continued to make headway on oily water collection. As a result, personnel working overnight were able to reduce the primary boomed area by two-thirds.
    • Two things have contributed to reduced collection rates and the smaller footprint: an observed decline in oily water entering the Port and more efficient skimming operations.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom has contained the spill.
  • As of 5:30 a.m. Tuesday, approximately 852 barrels (35,784 gallons) of water/oil mix has been collected from recovery activities on the water. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the collected liquids, a process known as metering.
    • From those collected volumes metered so far, approximately 511 gallons (12 barrels) of oil has been recovered.
    • In addition, 30 gallons of oil (less than one barrel) have been recovered from land to date.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • There were no injuries or incidents reported from the overnight shift work.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted. The oil tanker, Polar Enterprise, is expected to arrive at the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT), this morning (Tuesday).
  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor. This is a rocky area near the low tide line, which indicates a flow path below ground.
  • The source of the spill was identified as a concrete sump collection well, identified as 58-SU-3, and was isolated and secured on April 13. It is located west of the Emergency Response Building at the VMT, about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor.
  • More than 240 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 21, 11 a.m

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Fact Sheet April 20, 6 p.m.

Date: 6 p.m. Monday, April 20, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • As of 1:30 p.m. Monday, approximately 798 barrels (33,516 gallons) of water/oil mix has been collected from recovery activities on the water. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the collected liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately three-quarters of those collected emulsified liquids.
    • From those collected volumes metered so far, approximately 12 barrels (511 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • In addition, 30 gallons of oil have been recovered from land to date.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
    • Skimmers continue making progress and overflights confirm that the impacted area is decreasing and the booming footprint is shrinking.
    • Collection rates are starting to reflect the decline in contaminated fluid that is entering Port Valdez since the point of origin was secured.
    • In addition, skimmers which are more efficient and collect less water were deployed late last week.
    • This area has been boomed since April 12 and boom has contained the spill.
  • “The declining volume of collected liquids, along with gradual shrinking of the affected area, tells us we’re making progress,” said Commander Mike Franklin, Federal On-Scene Coordinator and United States Coast Guard representative in the Unified Command. “The response work couldn’t be carried out without the support from trained members of the community who are assisting through the Vessel of Opportunity program.”
  • The source of the spill was identified as a concrete sump collection well, identified as 58-SU-3, and was isolated and secured on April 13. It is located west of the Emergency Response Building (ERB) at the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT), about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor.
    • This sump is 4 feet by 4 feet, and 16 feet, 6 inches deep.
    • The sump collects rainwater from the containment area for nearby diesel fuel tanks, water from ERB floor drains, and other industrial runoff from nearby areas.
    • The sump routes these liquids through piping to the Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility for further processing.
    • The oily water found in the harbor is not consistent with the runoff usually collected by the sump.
    • Maintenance crews found debris in the check valve that prevented it from closing fully. This could have allowed oily water from the ballast water system to backflow into the sump.
    • Crews are investigating what other liquids could have back flowed into the sump.
    • Personnel are investigating the incident, including the origin of the oily water, as well as the sump’s components.
  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor. This is a rocky area near the low tide line, which indicates a flow path below ground.
    • Snow removal crews have cleared an area of interest near the Oil Spill Response Building and investigation continues in the area.
    • Crews continue to excavate uphill from the building to create a potential collection point and prevent more oily water from entering the area of the VMT small boat harbor.
    • Excavation is also taking place at other areas on Terminal, including around the sump that was the source of the spill.
  • Testing of critical system piping in the area was completed through the weekend; all piping passed pressure testing and verification of its integrity. There are no other leaks in the area.
  • More than 230 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed. Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted, and tanker loading has continued as scheduled.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 20, 6 p.m.

2020 VMT Admin Sump Incident – image gallery

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Overflight April 20
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Overhead of 2020 VMT Admin Sump Incident area

 

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Fact Sheet April 20, 1 p.m.

Date: 1 p.m. Monday, April 20, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • As of 5 a.m. Monday, approximately 788 barrels (33,096 gallons) of water/oil mix has been recovered. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the recovered liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately three-quarters of those recovered emulsified liquids.
    • From those recovered volumes metered so far, approximately 12 barrels (511 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • There were no injuries or incidents reported from the overnight shift work.
  • Testing of critical system piping in the area was completed through the weekend; all piping passed pressure testing and verification of its integrity. There are no other leaks in the area.
  • The source of the spill, isolated and secured on April 13, was a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor.
  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor. This is a rocky area near the low tide line, which indicates a flow path below ground.
    • Snow removal crews cleared an area of interest near the Oil Spill Response Building and investigation continues in the area.
    • Crews continue to excavate uphill from the building to create a potential collection point and prevent more oily water from entering the area of the VMT small boat harbor.
    • Skimmers continue making progress and overflights confirm that the impacted area is decreasing.
    • This area has been boomed since Sunday, April 12, and the boom has contained the spill almost entirely since then.
    • Excavation is also taking place at other areas on Terminal, including around the source of the spill, a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor, which has been isolated and secured since Monday.
  • More than 230 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • Response crews continue monitoring and maintaining boom systems.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted, and tanker loading has continued as scheduled.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 20, 1 p.m.

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Fact Sheet April 19, 5:15 p.m.

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident Fact Sheet

  • As of 4 p.m. Sunday, approximately 771 barrels (32,382 gallons) of water/oil mix has been recovered. Crews are measuring and analyzing the composition of the recovered liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately three-quarters of those recovered emulsified liquids.
    • From those recovered volumes metered so far,approximately12 barrels (511 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • Total deceased birds remain at 4.
  • One minor first aid injury was reported on Sunday. The individual was treated and returned to work.
  • A Sunday afternoon overflight of the work area and Port Valdez did not find any sheen outside of the boomed response areas.
  • Crews continue excavation and investigation of the flow path and primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor. This is a rocky area near the low tide line, which indicates a flow path below ground.
    • Snow removal crews cleared an area of interest near the Oil Spill Response Building and investigation continues in the area.
    • Crews continue to excavate uphill from the building to create a potential collection point and prevent more oily water from entering the area of the VMT small boat harbor.
    • Skimmers continue making progress and over flights confirm that the impacted area is decreasing.
    • This area has been boomed since Sunday, April12, and the boom has contained the spill almost entirely since then.
    • Excavation is also taking place at other areas on Terminal, including around the source of the spill, a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor, which has been isolated and secured since Monday.
  • More than 230 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • Response crews continue to monitor and maintain the boom systems.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom is deployed.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are also on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • TAPS operations are not impacted, and tanker loading has continued as scheduled.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

Statement from Crystal Smith, State On-Scene Coordinator representing the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation in the Unified Command: “Responders at the VMT continue to apply a methodical, measured approach toward determining the flow path in this event. We’re continuing to reinforce the importance of safety, focus, and patience as this work continues.”

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water- spill/.

Fact Sheet April 19, 5:15 p.m

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Picture taken on an overflight on Sunday afternoon.

 

Fact Sheet April 18, 6 p.m.

Date: 6 p.m. Saturday, April 18, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • As of 6 a.m. Saturday, approximately 720 barrels (30,240 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered. Crews have begun measuring and analyzing the composition of the recovered liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately half of those recovered emulsified liquids;
    • From those recovered volumes metered so far, approximately 8 barrels (315 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • Two oiled birds were found deceased today, bringing the total deceased to four.
  • A Saturday afternoon overflight of the work area and Port Valdez did not find any sheen outside of the boomed response areas.
  • Crews verified the primary entry point where oily water is making its way into Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor. This is a rocky area near the low tide line, which indicates a flow path below ground.
    • Crews are beginning to excavate uphill from this area to create a potential collection point and prevent more oily water from entering the water.
    • Skimmers continue making progress and overflights confirm that the impacted area is decreasing.
    • This area has been boomed since Sunday and the boom has contained the spill almost entirely since then.
  • Excavation is also taking place at other areas on Terminal, including around the source of the spill, a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor which has been isolated and secured since Monday.

“Finding the flow path will be challenging.” said Mike Day, Incident Commander and Alyeska representative in the Unified Command. “It requires significant and precise excavation. Digging is routine work on the VMT and for Alyeska, and we know it takes time and diligence that ensures that we do it right.”

  • More than 230 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • More than 26,000 feet of boom has been deployed.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene; 13 Alyeska work boats are on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • TAPS operations have not been impacted. The laden oil tanker, the Alaskan Legend, departed early Saturday afternoon. The next oil tanker isn’t scheduled to arrive for several days. All tankers are being docked and loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area. And as an added layer of safety, all tankers are departing during daylight hours.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 18 6 p.m.

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April 18: Overflight photos of the Valdez Marine Terminal area.
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April 18: Overflight photos of the Valdez Marine Terminal area.
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Overhead of 2020 VMT Admin Sump Incident area

 

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