Fact Sheet April 18, 11 a.m.

Date: 11 a.m. Saturday, April 18, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • As of 6 a.m. Saturday, approximately 720 barrels (30,240 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered. Crews have begun measuring and analyzing the composition of the recovered liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately half of those recovered emulsified liquids;
    • From those recovered volumes metered so far, approximately 8 barrels (315 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • There were no injuries or incidents reported from the overnight shift work.

The source of the spill, isolated and secured on Monday, was a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT) small boat harbor. Oily water is still entering Port Valdez in the vicinity of the VMT small boat harbor as the spill makes its way downhill.

  • On-water operations: Boom and skimming operations are containing and controlling the additional oily water coming into the VMT small boat harbor. The majority of the spill is contained within the first two rows of boom, close to shore, and crews have been working within the boomed area to push the spill into skimmers to increase recovery. Noticeable sheen has been almost entirely within the boomed areas throughout the week.
  • On-land operations: Testing, surveying, engineered excavations, exploratory digs and more activities around the sump area and beyond will continue today with the goals of: identifying the flow route of the oily water entering near the VMT small boat harbor; confirming the operational integrity of nearby Terminal infrastructure; and confirming that there are no other leak source
  • An evening overflight Friday did not find any sheen outside of the boomed response areas in Port Valdez. Foggy conditions prevented an overflight of the response area this morning.
  • More than 220 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • More than 25,270 feet of boom has been deployed.
  • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene – four were released after completing a sensitive area protection assignment.
  • 13 Alyeska work boats are on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • Friday, as a precautionary measure to protect nearby sensitive areas and prevent wildlife disturbance in Port Valdez, the team of four Vessel of Opportunity boats and a task force leader completed the placement of boom around two areas: Saw Island and Seal Island. Monitoring, as well as some additional boom and boom adjustments, will be made today. Booming to protect two closer sensitive areas – the Solomon Gulch Hatchery and the Valdez Duck Flats – was completed Wednesday and the areas have been monitored since.
  • TAPS operations have not been impacted. The oil tanker, The Alaskan Legend, was being loaded this morning, with an anticipated departure of early this afternoon (Saturday). All tankers are being docked and loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area. And as an added layer of safety, all tankers are departing during daylight hours.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 18 11 a.m.

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Overhead photo of the VMT Small Boat Harbor looking west.

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Fact Sheet April 17, 5:30 p.m.

Date: 5:30 p.m. Friday, April 17, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • As of 2 p.m. Friday, approximately 690 barrels (28,980 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered. Crews have begun measuring and analyzing the composition of the recovered liquids, a process known as metering.
    • Crews have metered approximately one-third of those recovered emulsified liquids;
    • From those recovered volumes metered so far, approximately 5 barrels (209 gallons) of oil was recovered.
    • Metering work continues and the exact volume of oil spilled remains undetermined.
  • An oiled bird has died, bringing the total deceased to two.
  • The source of the spill, isolated and secured on Monday, was a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor.
  • Oily water is still entering Port Valdez in the vicinity of the harbor as the spill makes its way downhill. Boom and skimming operations are containing and controlling the additional oily water coming into the harbor. Noticeable sheen has been almost entirely within the boomed areas throughout the week.
  • More than 220 people are involved in the response, locally and around the state.
  • More than 21,000 feet of boom has been deployed.
  • 19 Vessel of Opportunity boats are on scene, including four that joined today for additional sensitive area protection.
  • 13 Alyeska work boats are on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others.
  • Friday, as a precautionary measure and to prevent wildlife disturbance, a team of four vessels and a task force leader began placing boom around two other sensitive areas in Port Valdez: Saw Island and Seal Island. Booming to protect two sensitive areas in Port Valdez ­– the nearby Solomon Gulch Hatchery and the Valdez Duck Flats – was completed Wednesday and the areas have been monitored since.
  • Statement from Mike Day, Incident Commander and Alyeska representative in the Unified Command: “We train hard to protect wildlife in these challenging situations, and any loss is difficult. We will continue being deliberate in our decisions and work, especially on difficult tasks like identifying the flow route of the spill. We will remain focused on the safety of response personnel and our communities, and the protection of the environment.”
  • Statement from Commander Michael Franklin, Federal-On-Scene Coordinator and United States Coast Guard representative in the Unified Command: “The Unified Command has been working together to protect the health and safety of the response workforce and the community while aggressively responding to this incident. We have been faced with unique challenges but together we are able to overcome them and will continue to work diligently to contain and clean-up this spill as quickly and efficiently as possible.”
  • Statement from Crystal Smith, State On-Scene Coordinator and Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation representative in the Unified Command: “DEC and other state agencies, such as the Department of Fish and Game, are working with the response to ensure that Alaska and Alaskan’s interests are protected. In particular, there has been a proactive decision to set up boom around environmentally sensitive areas that are nearby, in order to keep them from being impacted if the sheen leaves the response area.”

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 17 530 pm

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Fact Sheet: Boom Maintenance, April 17

Date: Friday, April 17, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet – Boom maintenance

As of Friday morning, more than 21,000 feet of response boom is deployed during this response. This job doesn’t end with boom deployment:

  • A vessel is assigned and tasked to maintain these boom deployments 24 hours a day to inspect the integrity of the boom and ensure maximum efficacy to protect the environment.
    • They check for damaged boom and, if found, replace it.
    • Some booms have air and water chambers, which crews also check regularly to determine if reinflation is needed.
  • Exclusion and containment boom tactics are fixed boom tactics in which boom is deployed and secured in a specific area to either
    • 1) contain and corral spilled oil (containment tactic), or
    • 2) to protect an area from spilled oil (exclusion tactic).
  • Even though boom is set into a fixed position, these booming tactics are dynamic processes that require maintenance as environmental conditions change.
    • For boom that is connected to land, as the tides change, the seal formed against the land must be maintained to ensure there are no gaps that allow oil to enter or escape as the water level rises and falls.
    • Tides and currents also affect the shape of the boom deployment. The ideal deployment shape is a round or horseshoe shape where the rounded boom deflects the current and minimizes potential entrainment (turbulent leakage under the boom) of spilled oil.
    • Vessel crews work to re-anchor boom when bellies or sags form in order to maintain the ideal deployment shape.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet Boom maintenance April 17

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Fact Sheet April 17, 10 a.m.

Date: 10 a.m. Friday, April 17, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet

  • The spill amount remains undetermined; as of 6 a.m. Friday, approximately 681 barrels (28,602 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered.
  • An overflight around Port Valdez early Friday morning spotted a small sheen just outside containment. A taskforce of fishing vessels is already in formation to address it with current buster boom and absorbent material.
  • The source of the spill has been identified as a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor. The source at the sump has been isolated and secured since Monday, but some oily water is still entering the water in the vicinity of the small boat harbor as the spill makes its way downhill.
  • Boom and skimming operations are containing and controlling the additional oily water coming into the harbor. Engineers, inspectors and operations technicians are working to identify the spill’s flow route through a series of tests. On-land crews are digging snow, ice, dirt, gravel and fill, excavating the area around the sump to help identify spill boundaries and potential flow route.
  • No injuries were reported from overnight work.
  • TAPS operations have not been impacted.
  • More than 200 people locally and around the state are involved in the response.
  • On-water vessels summary:
    • More than 21,000 feet of boom has been deployed
    • 15 Vessel of Opportunity boats on scene, with four more ordered for additional sensitive area protection today
    • 13 Alyeska work boats on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others
  • Precautionary sensitive area protection: On Wednesday, booming to protect two sensitive areas in Port Valdez ­– the nearby Solomon Gulch Hatchery and the Valdez Duck Flats – was completed and the areas have been monitored since. Today, as a precautionary measure and to prevent wildlife disturbance, a team of four vessels and a task force leader plans to place boom around two other sensitive areas in Port Valdez: Saw Island and Seal Island.
  • A laden oil tanker, The Alaskan Explorer, was held overnight as an added safety measure so it could depart this morning in daylight hours. Another tanker is expected to arrive this morning and will be docked and loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 17, 10 a.m.

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Fact Sheet April 16, 5:30 p.m.

Date: 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 16, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident Fact Sheet

  • The spill amount remains undetermined. As of 6 a.m. Thursday, approximately 654 barrels (27,468 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered. An overflight this morning confirmed there is no noticeable sheen outside of the boomed areas.
  • The source of the spill has been identified as a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor. The source at the sump has been isolated and secured since Monday, but some oily water is still entering the water in the vicinity of the small boat harbor as the spill makes its way downhill.
  • Boom and skimming operations are containing and controlling the additional oily water coming into the harbor. To investigate possible flow paths, crews are digging through snow and ice, as well as dirt, gravel and fill.
  • Response crews were able to shorten the inner containment boom overnight, concentrating the spill to maximize recovery. More than 4,300 feet of boom has been deployed as 14 Vessel of Opportunity boats and 13 Alyeska work boats are on scene.
  • One seagull was reported deceased on April 15. There are no additional wildlife impacts. Extensive preparations have been undertaken in the event that other wildlife impacts occur. There are numerous Wildlife Task Forces working the response to help prevent additional wildlife impacts, and rapidly treat if needed.

In summary:

  • Two Wildlife Task Forces are focused on haze and capture. One team works on the water, one on land.
    • Trained wildlife task force members observe the area for wildlife and discourage its presence in the affected areas using only approved methods. They are also charged with collection of any wildlife, that is deceased, oiled or otherwise compromised, transporting them to the stabilization treatment facility.
  • Another Wildlife Task Force operates the stabilization treatment facility
    • This facility provides care to affected wildlife until they are able to be transported to the wildlife rehabilitation facility, where they remain until they are in a healthy condition.
    • This facility is currently being assembled and is expected to be complete by 6 p.m. today (Thursday) and staffed as needed.
    • Located on the Valdez Marine Terminal.
  • An oil tanker, The Alaskan Explorer, arrived this morning (Thursday) and is being loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area. It will not depart until after sunrise Friday morning as an added layer of safety in traveling through a busy response area.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 16, 530 p.m.

Overhead photo of the VMT Small Boat Harbor looking east.

Overhead photo of the VMT Small Boat Harbor looking west.

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Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Precautions April 16, 5 p.m.

Date: 5 p.m. Thursday, April 16, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident
Fact Sheet – COVID-19 precautions

For many weeks now, Alyeska has had focused groups of employees developing and implementing plans to keep workers safe through the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • This includes:
    • Developing plans for worker return-to-work screening.
    • Avid promoting of strong self-checks and healthy behaviors.
    • Moving hundreds of workers to remote work status to promote self-isolation and social distancing.
    • A robust quarantine plan that establishes health and decontamination procedures should an employee test COVID-positive.
    • These plans and processes remain in place during this response.

The response effort is being worked in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • This includes:
    • Requiring employees to wear cloth face coverings when working in close proximity is unavoidable.
    • Encouraging frequent cleaning and sanitation of surfaces and work stations.
    • Having personnel involved in the response work remotely whenever possible to promote social distancing and support both workforce and community wellness.

Employees who report to the Valdez Emergency Operations Center and to the VMT in support of the response are having their temperature taken before entry as part of regular screening processes.

In staffing the response, priority is being given to utilizing local resources and personnel to minimize influx of out-of-town workers in support of sustaining community health.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet COVID 19 precautions April 16, 5 p.m.

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Press Release: April 16, 1:30 p.m.

Date: 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 16, 2020

Response efforts continue at Valdez Marine Terminal

VALDEZ, Alaska – Response and recovery work on the water and on the ground continued in rainy conditions overnight and into today as crews respond to the spill at the Valdez Marine Terminal (VMT).

As of 6 a.m. Thursday, approximately 654 barrels (27,468 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered. An overflight this morning confirmed there is no noticeable sheen outside of the boomed areas.

The source of the spill has been identified as a sump located about a quarter-mile uphill from the VMT small boat harbor. The source at the sump has been isolated and secured since Monday, but some oily water is still entering the water in the vicinity of the small boat harbor as the spill makes its way downhill.

“Because of the nature of the spill and the snow cover in Valdez, determining the flow path and the spill amount is challenging,” said Crystal Smith, State On-Scene Coordinator and Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation representative in the Unified Command. “While we are working on identifying the flow path, boom and skimming operations are containing and controlling the additional oily water that is coming into the harbor.”

To investigate possible flow paths, crews are digging through snow and ice, as well as dirt, gravel and fill.

“The Valdez Marine Terminal has multiple systems buried underground, so the crews must conduct careful research, surveying and deliberate planning before excavating the ground to determine the flow path,” said Commander Michael Franklin, Federal-On-Scene Coordinator and United States Coast Guard representative in the Unified Command. “This process can take time. Crews are working as safely and efficiently as possible.”

Response crews were able to shorten the inner containment boom overnight, concentrating the spill to maximize recovery. More than 4,300 feet of boom has been deployed as 14 Vessel of Opportunity boats and 13 Alyeska work boats are on scene. Their crews are placing boom and operating skimmers, providing surveillance, swapping out boom when needed, and providing logistical support such as fueling, water, and waste collection services.

There are more than 200 people locally involved in the response with 152 working in the field and 54 assigned to the command post, some working remotely from locations in Valdez and around the state. All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Helicopter overflights resumed this morning and will continue as conditions allow. In addition, one unmanned aerial vehicle began overhead observation this morning.

There are no current operational impacts to the Trans Alaska Pipeline System. An oil tanker, The Polar Discovery, was loaded with Alaska North Slope Crude without incident and departed around 3 a.m. today (Thursday, April 16). Another tanker, The Alaskan Explorer, arrived around 4 a.m. and is being loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area.

The main priorities of the response remain the safety of response personnel and the community, protection of the environment, and open communication with the public and stakeholders throughout the response.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Press Release April 16, 130 p.m

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Overhead photo of the VMT Small Boat Harbor looking west.

 

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Overhead photo of the VMT Small Boat Harbor looking east.

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Fact Sheet April 16, 9:30 a.m.

Date: 9:30 a.m. Thursday, April 16, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident Fact Sheet

  • The spill amount remains undetermined; as of 6 a.m. Thursday, approximately 654 barrels (27,468 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered.
  • The source of the spill has been identified as a sump located uphill from the VMT small boat harbor. There is no continuing discharge of oil from this source. The cause of the spill is under investigation.
  • No injuries were reported from overnight work. The worker injured during the previous nightshift was evaluated last night and received a full release to return to work with no further checkups required.
  • TAPS operations have not been impacted.
  • Heavy rain fell in the Valdez area through the night and is expected to continue Thursday. Rain impacts operations in many ways:
    • Rain can potentially affect safety. Workers are being reminded to be aware of slick conditions caused by water and ice.
    • Rain can also increase the surface area of a spill or sheen; crews are deploying additional boom to ensure the spill remains contained, and personnel are monitoring boom and its connection points to land.
    • Rain-induced turbulence can also add to spill dispersion.
  • There are nearly 200 people locally involved in the response: 142 working in the field, 56 assigned to the command post – some work remotely in the Valdez area as they are able; in addition, numerous others are supporting the efforts remotely around the state.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • On-water operations summary:
    • More than 4,300 feet of boom has been deployed
    • 14 Vessel of Opportunity boats on scene
    • 13 Alyeska work boats on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others
  • On-land operations summary:
    • Engineers, inspectors and operations technicians are working to identify the spill’s flow route.
    • Teams are excavating the area around the sump to help identify spill boundaries and potential flow route.
    • Crews are continuing to manually collect contaminated snow and ice from the area around the sump.
  • An oil tanker, The Polar Discovery, was loaded with Alaska North Slope Crude without incident and departed around 3 a.m. today (Thursday, April 16). Another tanker, The Alaskan Explorer, arrived around 4 a.m. and is being loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area.
  • Helicopter overflights resumed this morning and will continue as conditions allow. In addition, one unmanned aerial vehicle has been approved for overhead observation. Those services will be provided by a Valdez-area contractor used regularly by SERVS/Alyeska.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 16, 930 a.m.

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Fact Sheet April 15, 6 p.m.

Date: 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 15, 2020

2020 Valdez Marine Terminal Admin Sump Incident

Fact Sheet

  • The spill amount remains undetermined; as of 3 p.m. Wednesday, approximately 623 barrels (26,166 gallons) of water/oil mix was recovered.
  • The source of the spill has been identified as a sump located uphill from the VMT small boat harbor. There is no continuing discharge of oil from this source. The cause of the spill is under investigation.
  • There are more than 180 people involved in the response; they are working in the field, from the command post, and remotely.
    • Precipitation, mostly rain, has been steady in the response area on Wednesday and is expected to continue through Thursday before waning Friday. Rain impacts operations in many ways, most importantly potentially affecting safety. Workers were reminded to be being aware of slick conditions caused by water and ice.
    • Rain can also increase the surface area of a spill or sheen, so crews are deploying additional boom to ensure the spill remains contained, and personnel are monitoring boom and its connection points to land.
    • All are working in accordance with state, local and Alyeska company policies and mandates in order to protect the health of the workforce and the surrounding communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • On-water operations summary:
    • More than 4,000 feet of boom has been deployed
    • 14 Vessel of Opportunity boats on scene
    • 13 Alyeska work boats on scene, including landing craft, inflatables, river boats and others
  • On-land operations summary:
  • Engineers, inspectors and operations technicians are working to identify the spill’s flow route.
  • Teams are excavating the area around the sump to help identify spill boundaries and potential flow route.
    • Crews continue to manually collect contaminated snow and ice from the area around the sump.
  • An oil tanker, The California, was loaded with Alaska North Slope Crude without incident and departed around 9 a.m. today (Wednesday). Another tanker, The Polar Discovery, arrived later this morning and is being loaded at VMT’s Berth 5, the farthest operational berth from the spill area.
  • For the safety of response personnel and the public, a Temporary Flight Restriction area remains in place, set at 5,000 feet elevation and one mile in radius over the VMT working area.
    • The 2 p.m. helicopter overflight was abbreviated due to foggy conditions but was able to confirm the spill remains contained within the boom. No other overflights will take place until conditions clear.

For information and updates on the response, visit www.alyeskaresponds.com and the ADEC site at http://dec.alaska.gov/spar/ppr/spill-information/response/2020/02-vmt-sump-oily-water-spill/.

Fact Sheet April 15, 6 p.m.

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